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Posts from — June 2010

What I learned in Curaçao…

Curaçao was an early addition to my list. I don’t know why, I don’t ever remember anyone talking about it, magazine generally don’t rave about the island. I guess I added visiting it just out of curiosity. To be completely honest, I didn’t even know where in the Caribbean it was. It just sounded so foreign and like a place I would never visit, same as Iceland. But, we all know now how I deal with places I never imagine I would travel to… I travel to them.

Curaçao, took all of about 10 minutes to grow on me. Just about as soon as we pulled away from Hato International Airport, did I come to really like this place. From that moment on the rest of the trip was just a confirmation of my good feelings towards the island.

I present to you now, what I had learned during my time in Curaçao…

  • To make the Ç hold down option(mac) or alt (pc) while typing C.
  • The Ç is called a cedilla (Wikipedia article on it)
  • For all intents and purposes, Curaçao is a Spanish-speaking country
  • You can get stranded on a bridge

  • Scuba Diving Magazine loves Curaçao cause the reefs are flawless

  • 8 oz Polar beer is a rip-off (Thanks for nothing Hugo Chavez)
  • Infinity Salt water pool = Awesome!

  • Danki means thank you in Papiamento (Pronounced = Donkey)
  • You can get a job as a Bridge Boat Driver

  • I love Arepitas
  • Iguanas are to Curaçao what squirrels are to North America
  • When jumping off a 40 ft cliff always try to land feet first ( Kit’s lesson)
  • 15% Service charge on restaurants tabs, means at some places you will have to double tip
  • Casinos are very depressing when there are no loud sounds of machines winning

Some other photos from the trip

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June 29, 2010   3 Comments

Bodies In the sand…

Visit all the places mentioned in the Beach Boy’s “Kokomo” 4 of 8

Aruba

The latest trip found Kit, Duck and myself on two of the three ABC islands. Aruba and Curaçao. Curaçao will be getting its own post shortly since visiting it was a stand-alone item on the list. I’m actually having a hard time writing about Aruba, not for lack of trying or for not enjoying myself while I was on the island, It’s just, I’m not sure what to write about. The perfect weather? Iguanas stealing food? Swimming in the crystal clear waters? The egyptian cotton like sand? I guess I just wrote about it all.

One thing I could write about Aruba is how accessible the island and the culture is. Which in my opinion is a double edge sword for the people of Aruba and it’s culture. Let me explain.

When one is looking for a vacation destination that is completely non-commercialized, non-americanized or remote. Aruba is not your place. If however, if one seeks after a 5 hour flight to find the same McDonald’s next to the same Senor frogs across from one of a dozen well-known resorts, then yes, Aruba might be your place.

Don’t get me wrong I love a good ol’ sloppy Big mac and a yard stick filled with a tropical drink like any other American tourist… sometimes. I get disappointed when I see an American chain on island after island that we visit. On one hand, tourism being the major income on the island, appeasing the masses might sound like the smart thing to do. But, when does it become detrimental to the island’s culture? After the 2nd or 10th hotel chain?

Nonetheless, you can’t  discount how transparently blue the water is, or how incredibly soft the sand on the beaches feel, or how orange the sunset becomes and lets not forget how good the constant cooling winds are. You can’t take any of that from Aruba. No matter how many Senor Frogs get erected up instead of real local restaurants.

Enough of my preaching, here are some of the pictures. I only have 4 more places to visit before I can complete this list item. Regardless of my feelings towards commercialism, I am having a wonderful time completing this item.

Mr. Starfish hanging out at Eagle Beach.

Fun Fact: Aruba is a desert Island, with on average 16 inches of rain a year. Next time someone asks  if you would like to be stranded on a desert island, You should probably opt for a Tropical/Rainforest-y type island instead.

Trekking to one of the “beaches” on the remote North coast of Aruba.

The natural Pool.

Stacking rocks is a way of saying “We were here” without using graffiti.

No caption needed.

Defying gravity at the natural Bridge.

You can’t say “Life sucks”, when this is your view.

And if you forgot how the song goes, or you need a little inspiration as you sit at work…

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June 22, 2010   No Comments

I Have Made Fire!

The inner caveman in me spoke out when I added Have a bon fire on the beach to the list. Actually, it was because of a scene from Police Academy which included the notorious Blue Oyster Bar… Here is the video incase you needed reminding.

In almost the exact fashion as our boys in blue from police academy, my bonfire went just about the same way minus, the naked women, saxophone, crowd of people and being that Kit and I were in Montauk, the black guy. Minus all those things, it was exactly the same.

Danny’s Guide to a successful Beach Bonfire… The Guide.

Step 1) Pick a beach

Step 2) Gather all materials needed for creating fire. Most survival experts say get a couple of stones, or a bow made of wood and tinder to light. I say, hogwash. Duraflame and a lighter. Added benefit to the Duraflame, you can purchase one that imitates the sound of real wood burning, or if you are feeling artistic or autistic they also have a special log that emits festive colors while burning.

Step 3) Light it up, Drink it up and enjoy.

(Traveling Duck optional)

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June 8, 2010   No Comments